Job Search Websites

The Appoquinimink School District partners with local businesses in the MOT area to offer opportunities for students in the Appoquinimink School District. Login to your Xello account and search opportunities to search and apply for local job opportunities.

Jobs for Teens

Our website is dedicated to helping teens find jobs.  Getting a job is tough, but getting a job when you have little or no experience makes it even tougher.  We're working to change that.

 

CareerBuilder

CareerBuilder is one of the largest job boards, providing job listings, resume posting, and career advice and resources to job seekers.

 

Indeed

Indeed is the top job site with millions of job listings from thousands of websites, including company career sites, job boards, newspaper classifieds, associations, and other online sources of job postings.

 

Dice

Dice is a leading site for tech job seekers.

 

Glassdoor

Glassdoor is a career community that helps people find jobs and companies that recruit top talent.

 

LinkedIn

LinkedIn connects the world's professionals to make them more productive and successful. LinkedIn is the largest professional network.

 

LinkUp

If you want to avoid spam, scams, and duplicate job listings, LinkUp is the job site for you.

 

Upwork

Upwork has tapped the trend towards freelance labor and gig-based opportunities by creating a marketplace to connect freelancers with employers who have projects to offer.

 

ZipRecruiter

ZipRecruiter uses innovative technology to learn about your job preferences as you apply for jobs from their extensive inventory of openings

Specialized Job Websites

 

EdJoin

The nation's number one education job board

 

USAJobs 

The federal government’s official job portal offers everything from entry-level opportunities to positions for experienced professionals within hundreds of agencies and organizations.

 

AngelList 

For those looking to work with startups, AngelList is the go-to job search site. You can build a profile, add connections and get regular updates when positions matching your criteria are posted.

 

Behance 

Designers and web professionals can find job opportunities on Behance, in addition to getting help with online portfolios.

 

College Recruiter

Current students and recent graduates can search for internships and entry-level jobs on this site.

 

Fairygodboss 

This site is all about women, from job searches to empowerment in the workplace and creating a supportive community. 

 

Hired 

Recruiters reach out to tech professionals based on their profiles on this site. Even better for job seekers: Salary info is disclosed upfront.

 

Idealist 

People interested in nonprofits and charitable work will find value in job listings and volunteering opportunities here.

 

Lawjobs 

One of the top job search sites for legal professionals, Lawjobs offers listings for attorneys, paralegals, and legal secretaries.

 

Mediabistro 

Want to work in media? Journalists, advertising and PR professionals, and freelancers can find jobs on Mediabistro. 

 

RecruitMilitary

Military veterans can search for opportunities for re-entering the civilian workforce on this site that focuses on veteran-friendly jobs.

 

We Work Remotely

Digital nomads can find a job that lets them work anywhere on this site.

Internship Opportunities



Most large companies will post internship opportunities on their company website. If you are interested in a particular profession, you may also consider calling businesses in your neighborhood and inquiring about internship opportunities.
 
Here are some resources and ideas to help you get started with your internship search:
 
Search Online Search for “high school internship [city and state or zip code]” for local internship opportunities or try internship search sites like Internships.com and Internship Programs to search for internships by area of interest and location.

 
Science Centers
science centers all over the U.S. offer internships. Look for ASTC-member science centers near you and search “internship” on their websites.

College Vine Blog Remote Internships

Jobs that offer college tuition assistance

Starbucks

Tuition Assistance Program Details:

The well-known Seattle-based coffee and restaurant chain offers employees full tuition at Arizona State University’s (ASU) online program. The program gives Starbucks’ hourly employees an opportunity to earn an undergraduate degree, with Starbucks covering the tuition costs. Starbucks developed a partnership with ASU, which reimburses its employees' tuition costs at the end of each semester. The program’s tuition assistance is valued at over $47,000 or the estimated cost of attending ASU’s online program for four years as a full-time student.

Eligibility:

Any Starbucks employee working an average of at least 20 hours weekly, at any company-operated store, is eligible from the very first day of their employment.

Check out Starbucks job listings on Monster.

 

Chipotle Mexican Grill

Tuition Assistance Program Details:

Chipotle reimburses its employee’s student tuition up to $5,250 – the IRS’s limit. Plus, employees are able to reimburse tuition costs from two- and four-year colleges, as well as technology and vocational schools.

Eligibility:

Hourly employees must have at least one year of employment at Chipotle under their belts, but salaried and hourly managers are eligible immediately after employment. Slight stipulations are attached: employees looking to qualify for the program must maintain at least a “C” average, provide course descriptions and submit their grades in order to be reimbursed by the company.

Check out Chipotle job listings on Monster.

 

McDonald’s

Tuition Assistance Program Details:

McDonald’s “Archway to Opportunity” tuition program can be used for both on-campus and online degree programs. Hourly paid restaurant workers are eligible to receive up to $2,500 yearly in tuition assistance. Additionally, restaurant managers are eligible to receive $3,000.

Eligibility:

Employees must work a minimum of 15 hours weekly and be employed at McDonald’s (both company-owned restaurants and at over 3,000 franchise locations) for at least three cumulative months before qualifying for the program.

Check out McDonald’s job listings on Monster.

 

Pizza Hut

Tuition Assistance Program Details:

Owned by Yum! Brands, the popular pizza giant offers a tuition program known as the “Life Unboxed EDU” tuition reimbursement program. The program offers hourly employees discounted tuition at Excelsior College – up to 45 percent off undergraduate tuition prices and 15 percent off graduate degree programs. U.S. News & World Report reports that, according to the college’s net tuition calculator, employees attending school part-time in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree can cut costs from nearly $6,000 down to just over $3,000.

Eligibility:

This tuition reimbursement benefit is offered to all Pizza Hut employees and their immediate family members after being employed at the company for at least 60 days.

Check out Pizza Hut job listings on Monster. (Note: Pizza Hut is owned by Yum! Brands, which also owns Taco Bell and KFC. Both of these fast-food chains offer scholarships and tuition assistance benefits as well.)

 

Chick-fil-A

Tuition Assistance Program Details:

Chick-fil-A offers scholarships and tuition assistance benefits to Team Members, as well as their families. Tuition discounts and grants from Chick-fil-A can be applied to more than 100 colleges and universities around the U.S., like Boston University, Purdue University, and Oglethorpe University. If a Team Member finds that the school they would like to attend is not a part of the program, they can actually submit a request to have the institution formally added.

Eligibility:

To qualify for tuition assistance at Chick-fil-A, Team Members must simply be employed by a Chick-fil-A Franchisee, a Chick-fil-A, Inc.-operated restaurant, or an STC brand restaurant. To apply, Team Members should reach out to their local Operator, Interim Manager, or Executive General Manager. Check out Chick-fil-A job listings on Monster.

High School Resume Tips

High School Resume - How-To Guide for 2020 (Blog from Novoresume)

Make an Outline:

Make a quick list or outline of all possible experiences, paid and unpaid, to include in your resume before you try to find the right language to describe them. Think of this as a brainstorming step and try to jot down as much down as you can.

 

Use Action Words :

Use active language when describing your experiences, so you are portrayed in a dynamic way. Start the phrases in your descriptions with action words like organized, led, calculated, taught, served, trained, tutored, wrote, researched, inventoried, created, designed, drafted, and edited.

 

Keep It Short (But Include All Necessary Information):

Your resume doesn't need to be any longer than a page. Some sections of the resume—such as contact information and experience—are required. But others, such as an objective or career summary, are optional. You can create a basic resume, then tailor it for each specific use. For example, on college applications, put more emphasis on academics, extracurriculars and community service. For internship and job applications, highlight your experience, community service and include references, pertinent skills and possibly your job objective. That might be, for example, to get experience working with animals or to learn business skills.

 

Include Resume Skills:

It's always a good idea to include skills related to the jobs for which you are applying. You probably have many skills that you can include that you acquired in school, sports, youth groups, extra-curricular activities, or volunteering. Remember that a winning high school resume needs to paint a picture of who you are. It should include the following:

  • Your basic information: name, address, phone and email.

  • Education: high school name and address, graduation date, class rank, GPA, specific courses.

  • Activities: extracurricular in and out of school

  • Community service: in and out of school. Make sure you list any leadership roles.

  • Work experience: any summer or school-year jobs.

  • Accolades: academic and nonacademic awards and honors

 

Tell a Story:

Connect your experience and skills with the qualifications for the role. For example, if you’re applying for a cashier position, but haven’t yet held a job with that exact title, emphasize your customer service skills, facility with mathematics, work ethic, and ability to work as a team. Read the job description and match your experience with their requirements.

 

Proofread Your Draft and Print Copies:

Review your draft very carefully before finalizing your document and make sure there are no spelling or grammatical errors. Ask your counselor, parents, or a favorite teacher to critique your resume.

Resume Building Resources

Writing a Resume

High School Resume Step by Step

High School Resume Examples

Overview of High School Resumes

AVID: Art of the Resume

Sample HS Resume + Action Verbs

Resume Action Verbs

Job Interview Tips

Be on Time!

  • Don’t get there late. 

  • Get to your interview about 15 minutes ahead of your appointment to allow time to freshen up

  • Check-in between 5-10 minutes ahead of your interview. 

 

Prior to Your Interview

  • Research the company, you want to get a feel for the company culture, mission statement, and the more information about the position you are interviewing for

 

Appearance

  • Be dressed professionally and appropriately for the company you are interviewing with

  • Avoid excessive cologne or perfume

 

Technology

  • Turn off your cell phone before you enter the interview or leave it in your car

  • Remove Bluetooth phones or earbuds

 

Always Bring

  • A notebook, and pen, use them to take notes and write down the name of your interviewer

  • Extra copies of your resume

  • A list of potential questions to ask at the end of the interview

 

During the Interview

  • Be prepared to answer basic questions about your qualifications and goals.

  • Be prepared to discuss compensation and benefits, but don’t bring it up too soon or dwell on it. 

  • Be prepared to discuss how your skills are a match to the position and the company

  • Do your best to come across as confident and determined vs desperate, or a know it all. 

  • Remember to ask for the job, or tell the interviewer why you want the job.

 

Behavior

  • Make good eye contact without staring and shake hands firmly but do not crush the interviewer’s hand

  • Never smoke or chew gum during an interview

  • Don’t ask to use the restroom during an interview unless it’s an emergency

  • Don’t lie or distort prior work experience and never bad mouth a prior employer or company

  • Act mature and professional, sit with good posture, no yawning, nervous laughter, giggling, finger tapping, humming, etc. 

  • Don’t use slang terms such as “you know” or “whatever”

 

Follow Up

  • Send a follow-up note/email one or two days after the interview to thank the interviewer for his/her time and reiterate your interest in the job

 

Job Search Tips

1. Choose Job Sites Carefully:

Jobs are listed on thousands of different websites, so be selective about which ones you use. This will also save you time and steer you to jobs you won’t otherwise find.

 

2. Refine Your Job Search:

Search using keywords and add more terms to narrow your search. Don’t forget to specify your location; your zip code normally works fine. Most job sites also have an Advanced Job Search so you can narrow your results using, for example, a particular name, job title, or commuting distance. 

 

3. Set up Email Job Alerts:

Save your job searches to receive email job alerts including new jobs matching your criteria. Many sites also let you save any job search as an RSS feed. This will help you apply for jobs as soon as they are posted, making it more likely employers will notice you. 

 

4. Keep it Focused!

Only apply to jobs you are qualified for. Companies notice candidates with the skills and experience they’re looking for. If you don’t have these, your resume will be ignored. 

 

5. Watch Out for Scam Job Listings:

Be careful if you see job listings promising quick and easy income, or requiring a fee or your social security number in order to apply - they’re likely to be scams. 

 

6. Write a Customized Cover Letter:

A well-written cover letter that is customized to the company or individual recipient shows you are serious. Try to show how your qualifications and experience relate to the company’s needs. Check out Harvard Business Reviews tips on how to write an effective cover letter here: https://hbr.org/2014/02/how-to-write-a-cover-letter

 

7. Post Your Resume:

Posting your resume to job boards helps companies find you online. Bear in mind that anyone may be able to see it, including your current employer. Most job sites give you the option of posting anonymously, although companies may then be less likely to contact you. 

 

8. Clean Up Your Act:

Check your resume and cover letters for typos and grammatical errors. Use consistent font sizes and formatting in your resume. Potential employers may look at any online profile of yours, so keep them up-to-date and free of content that would embarrass you. 

 

9. Do Your Research:

Spend time on the company’s website and learn as much as you can about the companies products and services. Read up on company news and trends in the industry. Find out who is interviewing and Google their names to learn about them. If you know anyone who works at a company you are applying to, try to speak with them first for advice. 

 

10. Know Your Salary:

Once companies are ready to make you an offer, they’re likely to discuss your salary needs. If you’re armed with objective salary information, you’ll be in a better position to negotiate.

ASD High School Students: Looking for a Job or Work-Based Learning Immersion? 
Visit your school's Work-Based Learning Virtual Office to explore available opportunities and more!
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